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For Women Only Show Posted Date:  04/10/14
The 2014 For Women Only Show is
Thursday, April 24 and
Saint Francis Community Services
has your tickets!
Come to any of three Salina locations
to pick up your free tickets
-entry only with a ticket-
fill it out, and enter to win a diamond necklace.
Stay for a visit at our booth and pick up some giveaways,
enter to win a grand prize!

Food, Fashion, Prizes, a Comedienne!


Meet the Davis family Posted Date:  03/21/14
The day Sierra and Angela talk about most, the one they recall as their happiest, has little to do with a snowy Christmas morning or an especially bountiful birthday party. Nor is it linked to their vacation at the seashore. Or, even, the family trip to Sea World. No, the 10-year-old twins agree that their all-time favorite day is April 20, 2012– the day Tim and Kim Davis adopted the girls and became their “forever family.”
“It’s their proudest moment,” said Kim Davis. “And it will stay that way, I think, forever.”
Unable to have biological children, the Oberlin, Kansas couple explored international adoption early in their 10-year marriage. Tim, however, had once worked as a counselor at a boys’ juvenile detention facility. His experience had shown him that there were kids closer to home that needed families, and it weighed on him. Kim had just mailed the international adoption application and non-refundable fee when, two days later, Tim came home and announced they would try foster care. And that was that.
Through friends, they knew of a married couple fostering twin 6-year-old girls who might soon be up for adoption. Tim and Kim thought they could provide those girls with a family.

“So, we started the licensing process, but in the meantime, the twins returned to their birth mom,” said Kim Davis. “We got licensed in August 2009, but in October received the phone call that the girls were coming back in. They asked if we were still interested.”
So, it turned out, the first children Tim and Kim Davis fostered are now their adopted daughters. Since then, they’ve fostered five other children through Saint Francis Community Services, three of whom have been able to rejoin their birth family.
“This is the best thing that I’ve done with my life, ever,” said Kim Davis. “I wouldn’t have loved biological children any more than I love the children in our house. Step, foster or adopted children - there’s no difference. They’re awesome kids, and they just need someone to nurture them. If you’re willing to give just an ounce of love, they’ll grow wings and fly. It’s amazing.”
Although licensed to foster children ages 0-18, they’ve so far only taken in children five years or younger. That’s because it’s important to the twins, especially Sierra (the eldest), that they be the “big” kids in the house. Besides, the girls dote on the little ones.
“They love getting new kids; they consider them siblings,” said Kim Davis. “It can be hard when we have to say goodbye, though. There are lots of tears – and lots of ‘this is what God had planned, and isn’t it better to have known them for the time we did than to have not known them at all?’ If they ever say they don’t want to foster anymore, we’ll stop. But, we haven’t gotten to that point yet.”
It is satisfying, though, when a child can safely return home. They still keep in touch with the mother of two other young girls they fostered.
“It was hard to see them go, but their mother worked really hard to get them back,” said Tim Davis. “She did everything she was supposed to do, and we tried to help her as much as we could. You need beds for the kids? We can provide beds. You need car seats? We have extras. If they’re really trying, and they really want their kids back, let’s do it – 100 percent.”
Saying goodbye isn’t the only challenge. There is the scheduling – juggling doctor visits, therapy sessions, parental visitation, school events. And then, of course, there are the stories. It’s not easy to hear about the abuse and neglect many foster children experience. Yet, Tim and Kim Davis believe fostering is still worth it.
“Don’t be afraid,” said Tim Davis. “There are some things that might scare you, but these children are reaching for love. You can provide the house, food, and clothing - but foster parenting is so much more than providing the basics for life. All they want is for someone to love them. That’s it. It doesn’t have to be difficult.
My best reward is when they go to bed at night and say, ‘I love you.’ I mean, hearing a little kid tell you ‘I love you’ is the most awesome thing in the world.”



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